INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES FILM SERIES

September 24, 25 & 26 (Showtimes TBA)

To celebrate 2019 as the UNESCO International Year of Indigenous Languages and National Hispanic Heritage Month, we have chosen to showcase three important films on indigenous languages of the Americas. We chose Wiñaypacha (Aymara) and Los Ojos del Camino (Quechua) because these films were made using indigenous languages exclusively. We chose Lantec Chaná (Chaná, Spanish) because it highlights the plight of endangered languages and the possible future awaiting them when only one speaker remains. 

LOS OJOS DEL CAMINO ("THE EYES OF THE JOURNEY")
September 24

Filmed entirely in Quechua, the language of the Inca empire and its modern day descendants in the Andean region of South America, Los Ojos del Camino is a visual poem with awe-inspiring images of the Andean mountains. It focuses on a spiritual master of the Andean tradition who emerges in different regions of the Cordillera and disappears again, like a ghost taking one last look at the sacred mountains, conversing with water, rocks, and men. His quest is to discover the disease that the human race suffers from.

FEATURING WRITER/DIRECTOR RODRIGO OTERO HERAUD AS SPEAKER/PRESENTER

LANTEC CHANÁ
September 25

Blas Jaime, a retired man from Entre Ríos, Argentina, publicly revealed at 71 years of age that he was the last heir of the Chaná, a language native to South America that had been considered extinct for over 200 years. Investigations by Pedro Viegas Barros, a researcher and linguist specializing in indigenous languages, confirmed the claim, inspiring recognition of Blas as the last Chaná speaker by UNESCO. Together, they embarked an odyssey to transcend this cultural legacy by conserving the last vestiges of the Chaná language and way of life before it disappeared from the world. Could they transcend his legacy?

FEATURING WRITER/DIRECTOR MARINA ZEISING AS SPEAKER/PRESENTER

WIÑAYPACHA ("ETERNITY")
September 26

A couple of elderlies try to survive in Los Andes of Peru while they wait for their son.

This is the first movie entirely shot in Aymara, an indigenous language spoken by the Aymara people of the Andes in the south of Peru and in the northwest of Bolivia.

SPEAKER/PRESENTER TO BE ANNOUNCED